Associate Professor Tan Bee Tin

PhD (Southampton University), MA (TESOL) Institute of Education, University of London

Biography

Tan Bee Tin joined The University of Auckland in 2004. Previously she lectured on the MA in ELT (English Language Teaching) and MA in ELL (English Language and Literatures) programmes at Assumption University, Bangkok. She did an MA in TESOL at the Institute of Education, University of London and a PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University College Chichester (Southampton University), UK. She has presented papers at various conferences in the UK, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore and Uzbekistan, and has also published articles in international journals and conference proceedings.

Research | Current

I am interested in postgraduate supervision and would welcome enquiries from prospective students in topics related to the following areas:

  • materials development for language teaching
  • language teacher education
  • creativity in language learning and teaching
  • the role of interest in (language) learning
  • investigating language teaching/learning practices in Asian contexts

Most of my research projects have been conducted in Asia (e.g. Indonesia, Nepal, Vietnam, Myanmar, Thailand, etc). I have just completed two major projects:

  1. Investigating the nature of interest with particular reference to English language learners in Burma (Myanmar)
  2. Investigating language learning opportunities and affordances offered by creative writing activities in EFL / ESL classrooms (using a group of students in Indonesia).

Both projects are funded by the University of Auckland. 

My book entitled  'Stimulating Student Interest in Language Learning: Theory, Research and Practice' (published by Palgrave Macmillan, in 2016) explores the issues and concerns many language teachers have in not just helping able students to learn a foreign or second language but more importantly how to get reluctant learners to become interested in language learning. It is the first of its kind in the field of language teaching/learning which examines a popular but ill-defined concept ‘interest’ in detail. It offers theoretical explorations, practical undertakings and empirical findings arising from my own research and practice in the field conducted over a period of ten years in New Zealand and Asia (e.g. Myanmar, Vietnam, and Singapore).

Teaching | Current

LANGTCHG 300 Theory and Practice of Language Teaching

LANGTCHG 302 Practical Language Teaching

LANGTCHG 746 Materials Development and Evaluation

LANGTCHG 755 Special Topic: Creativity in Language Learning and Teaching

LANGTCHG 764 Creativity: Research & Practice

Postgraduate supervision

Current PhD supervision:

  • Vincent Troy Greenier. (submitted). Exploring the Relationship between Creativity, Second Language Learning, and the EFL Curriculum:  An Ethnographic Case Study Analysis. (Main supervisor)

  • Luan Pham. (in progress) Humanizing global EFL course-books for students in Vietnam: Effects on language performance, interest and self-esteem. (Main supervisor)

  • Pariwat Tharauedee. (in progress). The cognitions and teaching practices of non-native English teachers in Thailand with regard to English as an international language. (Co-supervisor)

  • Siriphan Suwannalai. (in progress). A narrative inquiry on Thai students’ experiences in New Zealand in social, cultural perspectives and using English as international language. (Co-supervisor)

  • Vivian Wang. (in progress). The effects of different types of planning and +/- few elements on L2 oral production. (Co-supervisor)

Completed PhD PhD supervision:

  • Beidi Li. 2016. Becoming English language teachers: A multiple case study of transnational native English-speaking teachers’ identities construction. PhD thesis. The University of Auckland, New Zealand. (Main supervisor)

  • Andre Breedt. 2016. Ghosts in the System:Beliefs about Teacher Roles and the Shaping of Professional Identities within a Community of Practice. The University of Auckland, New Zealand. (Co-supervisor).

  • Ajmal Khan. 2014. Micro-level language planning: a study of the language attitudes and practices in the context of two elite English-medium schools The University of Auckland, New Zealand. (Co-supervisor).

  • Juan Tian. 2014. Understanding Chinese EFL Teachers’ Beliefs about English with a Yin-Yang Perspective. PhD thesis. The University of Auckland, New Zealand. (Main supervisor)

  • Tun Nur Afizah Zainal Ariff. 2010. English for DAEES: An ethnographic discourse analysis approach to understanding the spoken language use/discourse of DAEES. PhD thesis. The University of Auckland, New Zealand. (Main supervisor)

  • Julian Frazier. 2009. A teacher study group of secondary school English teachers in Senegal: A case study. Unpublished Phd Thesis. Leeds Metropolitan University, UK. (Co-supervisor)

Completed MA supervision (at University of Auckland):

  • Rachada  Lekprathum. 2016. Investigating the effectiveness of dictionary use on vocabulary learning and retention. MA dissertation. The University of Auckland, New Zealand
  • Qian Wang. 2015. Identifying Out-of-Class Chinese Learning Language Activities and Factors that Influence these Activities. MA dissertation. The University of Auckland, New Zealand
  • Mai Alosaimi. 2014. Effect of Single-word and Two-word Collocations on Vocabulary Learning and Retention. MA dissertation. The University of Auckland, New Zealand.
  • Toby Harris. 2013. "Teaching listening from the bottom-up: An intervention study into the effectiveness of the explicit teaching of features of connected speech and focused exposure on listening comprehension." MA dissertation. The University of Auckland, New Zealand.
  • Aaron Dougan. 2012. A study on scaffolding among EFL learners in a pair work task. MA dissertation. The University of Auckland, New Zealand.
  • Beidi Li. 2010. A tale of expectations and perceptions: Non-native English speaking students in Masters level TESOL programs. MA dissertation. The University of Auckland, New Zealand.
  • Yan Chen. 2010.  Investigating male and female Chinese EFL learners, English learning motivation in New Zealand. MA dissertation. The University of Auckland, New Zealand.
  • Jia Shu. 2009. The relationship between teachers, beliefs and course materials adaptation: In the context of teaching English as a second language. MA dissertation. The University of Auckland, New Zealand.
  • Ajmal Khan. 2009. Genre analysis of letters of job application. MA dissertation. The University of Auckland, New Zealand.
  • Jiangqiong Qu. 2008. Cultures of learning: Cross-cultural comparison of coursebooks. MA dissertation. The University of Auckland, New Zealand.
  • Ravinder Kaur. 2007. Use of L1 and L2 in L3 problem solving task and its influence on the performance. Unpublished MA dissertation. The University of Auckland, New Zealand.
  • Nick Moore. 2006. The joint construction of knowledge in language advisory. MA dissertation. The University of Auckland, New Zealand.
  • Qiaoling Peng. 2006. Cultural components in Chinese as a foreign language textbooks and English as a global language textbooks. MA dissertation. The University of Auckland, New Zealand.
  • Feng Jin. 2006. The Effectiveness of Recasts in an Adult General English Classroom. MA Thesis. The University of Auckland, New Zealand.
  • Jennifer Naeem. 2005. Self-access, perceptions and cultural expectations: A study of the perceptions and expectations of Asian and Maori learners regarding self-access and the use of the self-access learning laboratory at the Auckland University of Technology. MA dissertation. The University of Auckland, New Zealand.
  • Syed Mohammad Ali Rizvi. 2005. Code-switching and code-mixing as an index of language shift: A case study of a young (four years old) Pakistani immigrant in Auckland, New Zealand learning English and Urdu simultaneously. MA dissertation. The University of Auckland, New Zealand.
  • Fengmei Wang. 2004. Lexical cohesion in relation to writing quality. MA dissertation. The University of Auckland, New Zealand.
  • Suet Fong Lau. 2004. The study of language anxiety of three ESL students in New Zealand. MA dissertation. The University of Auckland, New Zealand.

Dr Tan Bee Tin's Postgraduate Supervision

Responsibilities

Deputy Head (Postgraduate)

Areas of expertise

 

 

Selected publications and creative works (Research Outputs)

  • Tin, T. B. (2016). Stimulating Student Interest in Language Learning: Theory, Research and Practice. Palgrave Macmillan UK. 10.1057/978-1-137-34042-9
  • Tin, T. B. (2015). Creativity in second-language learning. In R. H. Jones (Ed.) The Routledge Handbook of Language and Creativity (pp. 433-451). London and New York: Routledge.
  • Tin, T. B. (2014). A look into the local pedagogy of an English language classroom in Nepal. Language Teaching Research, 18 (3), 397-417. 10.1177/1362168813510387
    URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2292/22967
  • Tin, T. B. (2014). Creativity in ELT: From Communicative to Creative tasks. Paper presented at 48th Annual International IATEFL Conference and Exhibition Harrogate International Conference Centre, Harrogate, UK. 2 April - 5 April 2014. Related URL.
  • Tin, T. B. (2014). Creativity in language learning and teaching. Paper presented at The 3rd UAD TEFL International Conference (Sept 17-18, 2014, Yogyakarta, Indonesia), Yogyakarta, Indonesia. 17 September - 18 September 2014. Related URL.
  • Tin, T. B. (2014). Creativity as a form of autonomy: broadening ‘possibilities’ within constraints. Paper presented at Doing Research in Applied Linguistics 2 / Independent Learning Association Conference 2014 (DRAL 2/ILA 2014), King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok, Thailand. 12 June - 14 June 2014. Related URL.
  • Tin, T. B. (2014). Creativity in Language Learning. Paper presented at 14th CLESOL conference, Essentials for Learning and Teaching: Ko te Pū, ko te Ako, Wellington, New Zealand. 10 July - 13 July 2014. Related URL.
  • Tin, T. B. (2014). Learning English in the periphery: A view from Myanmar (Burma). Language Teaching Research, 18 (1), 95-117. 10.1177/1362168813505378

Identifiers

Contact details

Office hours

By appointment (or as announced in the course outline)

Primary location

CLL - Bldg 207
18 SYMONDS ST
AUCKLAND 1010
New Zealand

Web links