Media appearances

Academic staff in the Faculty of Arts frequently provide expert commentary in the media.

The weaponisation of blasphemy in Indonesia

Dr Chris Wilson (Politics and International Relations) argues that the imprisonment of Jakarta's governor has set a dangerous precedent for using the law to limit the full participation of minorities in Indonesian politics. Newsroom, Wednesday 10 May 2017.

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Making noise for more Māori writers

Dr Paula Morris (English, Drama and Writing Studies)wants diversity in our literature to be an outcome, not a goal. Newsroom, Wednesday 10 May 2017.

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France rejects Le Pen, elects youngest president in history

Dr Mark Amsler (Europe Institute) talks with Mark Sainsbury about the election of France's youngest ever president, Emmanuel Macron. Radiolive, Monday 8 May 2017.

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Debunking an ‘alternative fact’ of the French election

Associate Professor Deborah Walker-Morrison (European Languages and Literature) takes a close look at Emmanuel Macron's recent comments about French culture. Newsroom, Thursday 4 May 2017.

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The psychology behind why tourists take nude photos

Dr Ron Kramer (Sociology) discusses how social media is changing the way we think about ourselves and others. Stuff, Thursday 4 May 2017.

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Tackling the silence around Pacific youth suicide

Dr Jemaima Tiatia-Seath (Pacific Studies) says we need to work together to bring Pacific youth suicide out in the open. Newsroom, Wednesday 3 May 2017.

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Privacy is not always a good thing

Associate Professor Tim Dare (Philosophy) encourages us to think carefully about whether we'd all be better off if we cared about privacy a little less. NZ Herald, Tuesday 2 May 2017.

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Missiles on Syria: An academic view

Associate Professor Stephen Hoadley (Politics and International Relations) examines the US missile strike on a Syrian military air base from an academic point of view.

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North Korea missile test: What happens next?

Dr Stephen Noakes talks to Duncan Garner about the ramifications of North Korea's latest missile test launch. Newshub, Tuesday 18 April 2017.

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The troll: a dark shadow on the internet

Associate Professor Luke Goode (Media and Communication) takes a look at trolling on the internet. Newsroom, Monday 10 April 2017.

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Proper response needed to abuse in care

Dr Stephen Winter (Politics and International Relations) argues that the government needs to establish an independent inquiry into abuse in state care, to publicly apologise to those affected and to provide prompt and adequate redress. Newsroom, Monday 10 April 2017.

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Three people involved in Lindauer heist - police

Dr Ngarino Ellis (Art History, Museums and Cultural Heritage) talks to Guyon Espiner about the ram raid theft of two Gottfried Lindauer paintings from Parnell. Morning Report, Radio NZ, Monday 3 April 2017.

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From the fog of war to the blaze of the PR battle

Dr Maria Armoudian (Politics and International Relations) writes about the PR battle Nicky Hager and Jon Stephenson are facing over the allegations made in Hit & Run. Newsroom, Monday 27 March 2017.

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How do we define terrorism?

Dr Chris Wilson (Politics and International Relations) speaks to Amanda Jane Robinson about the parameters of terrorism and the media representation surrounding terror attacks. 95bFM, Monday 27 March 2017.

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The history of English

Associate Professor Mark Amsler (Comparative Literature) talks through the history of English and how it came to be the language so many of us speak today with Jesse Mulligan. Radio NZ, Monday 27 March 2017.

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NZ can’t ignore water warnings

Distinguished Professor Dame Anne Salmond (Anthropology, Māori Studies) argues that declining standards for fresh water in New Zealand must be decisively tackled. Newsroom, Sunday 26 March 2017.

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Send More Chuck Berry: A tribute to the man who sent rock n’ roll interstellar

Associate Professor Nabeel Zuberi (Media and Communication) remembers Chuck Berry's pioneering personal and musical influence. The Spinoff, Monday 20 March 2017.

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Mercury Island Dig

Greater Mercury Island/Ahuahu was the site of some very early occupation and industry by the first colonists to New Zealand. Professor Simon Holdaway (Anthropology) is the dig director and takes us through what’s been found and what we can know about the earliest people to occupy this land. RadioLive, Sunday 12 March 2017.

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Sociologist Alan France on New Zealand's generational war

Ryan Bridge talks with Professor Alan France on New Zealand's generational war between Baby Boomers, Gen X and Y. RadioLive, Sunday 12 March 2017.

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Dr Alice Mills talks about research on emergency accommodation

Dr Alice Mills (Sociology) gives her views on the best way to deal with short term emergency housing for vulnerable tenants. The Panel, Radio NZ, Monday 27 February 2017.

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Do the Grammys have a diversity problem?

Dr Kirsten Zemke (Anthropology) discusses the questions raised this year about how diverse the Grammys are and whether they are indeed still culturally relevant. 95bFM, Tuesday 14 February 2017.

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Kim Dotcom: Caught in the web

The internet, piracy, privacy, and ownership are at the heart of Professor Annie Goldson's latest documentary. Radio NZ, Sunday 5 February 2017.

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Playground parodies

Associate Professor Mark Amsler (Cultures, Languages and Linguistics) has has looked into the secret world of playground parodies and poems and has some fascinating insights and examples. RadioLIVE, Sunday 5 February 2017.

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Executive orders can be challenged, and they have been

Associate Professor Stephen Hoadley (Politics and International Relations) discusses executive orders with Rachel Smalley. Newstalk ZB, Monday 30 January 2017.

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The perfect tribute to Mary Tyler Moore

Dr Misha Kavka (Media, Film and Television) talks with Graeme Hill about Mary Tyler Moore, a woman who left a legacy crucial to those who came after her, and changed the face of the 70s television sitcom with her groundbreaking show. RadioLIVE, Thursday 26 January 2017.

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How getting a tattoo became so mainstream

Dr Misha Kavka (Media, Film and Television) discusses the societal shift from seeing tattoos as an act of rebellion to being embraced as an art form. NZ Herald, Saturday 21 January 2017.

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Why cringe at Waitangi?

Dr Hirini Kaa (History, Theological and Religious Studies) argues that Waitangi Day should make us think, so that we can have a future that we can truly be proud of. Stuff, Monday 9 January 2017.

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Poetry brings peace behind bars

Associate Professor Tracey McIntosh (Sociology) the Auckland Region Women's Corrections Facility for years, teaching the women to write poetry. Radio NZ, Thursday 5 January 2017.

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New Zealand's political shake-up

Associate Professor Jennifer Curtin (Politics and International Relations) reflects on the resignation of John Key, Inside Story, Tuesday 6 December 2016.

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Lucky generations squandered benefits of post-war social mobility

Dr Neal Curtis (Media, Film and Television) argues that by the time Millennials were being born, Boomers and Gen Xers had voted in politicians who would begin to strip away social security, undermine public investment and any legitimacy there lay in dissent. NZ Herald, Tuesday 13 September 2016.

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Brazil's 'soft coup' is not the end of a lively democracy

Dr Genaro Oliveira (Latin American Studies) argues that most Latin American democratic gains have been made through bottom-up, grassroots non-televised events — which are signs of an alive and healthy democratic tradition. NZ Herald, Friday 2 September 2016.

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The idea there's no such thing as society is extremely damaging

Distinguished Professor Dame Anne Salmond (Māori Studies) argues that as a small, intimate society that was once relatively equal, where ideas of decency, integrity and a 'fair go' were fundamental, New Zealand has struggled to cope with the impact of neo-liberal philosophies. Dominion Post, Tuesday 16 August 2016.

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‘Squatters on their own whenua’: Hirini Kaa on the age old problem with our brand new Unitary Plan

Dr Hirini Kaa (School of Humanities) reflects on the abandonment of the mana whenua provisions in the Unitary Plan. The Spinoff, Monday 15 August 2016.

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Erdogan has failed democracy’s test. The world, NZ included, must respond

The Turkish president has brutally suppressed protesters and purged every branch of government of any opposition. We must stand up against him, writes Dr Maria Armoudian (Politics and International Relations). The Spinoff, Sunday 14 August 2016.

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What happened to the truth in politics? It got eaten by finance

Dr Campbell Jones (Sociology) argues that the rejection of truth in politics is not coincidental but the result of a particular set of political and ideological priorities. The Spinoff, Saturday 6 August 2016.

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Isis' promises siren song for loners

Professor Jean-Jacques Courtine (European Studies) argues that there is one obvious way to fight terrorism: by building an inclusive society. NZ Herald, Friday 5 August 2016.

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Sexting and cyberspace safety

Dr Claire Meehan (Sociology) speaks with Kathryn Ryan about building better strategies and skills to make young people safer in cyberspace. Radio NZ, Nine to Noon, Thursday 4 August 2016.

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A little win for all in Brazilian Olympics

Dr Genaro Oliveira (Latin American Studies) argues that organising a global event in a relatively poor and unstable tropical setting is more truly representative of the world most of us live in. NZ Herald, Thursday 4 August 2016.

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The spread of Isis and a values void in the West

Dr Nicholas Ross Smith (Politics and International Relations) argues that making inroads against ISIS requires the West to rediscover its ideological confidence. The Spinoff, Saturday 16 July 2016.

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Balance needed after ravages of neo-liberalism

Dame Anne Salmond (Māori Studies, Anthropology) argues that it is time for a new and better balance to be struck between the pursuit of individual aspirations and collective values and interests. NZ Herald, Friday 15 July 2016.

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Refugees are an invaluable asset

Dr Louise Humpage (Sociology) argues that refugees bring many benefits to New Zealand, which are rarely recognised. NZ Herald, Thursday 16 June 2016.

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Killer not a true portrayal of a genuine Afghan

Dr Zain Ali (Islamic Studies Research Unit) argues that Omar Mateen represents the very opposite of what he knows about Afghans and about young Muslims. NZ Herald, Wednesday 15 June 2016.

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Gracelessness and grace: Why Michael Bird is wrong about religious freedom

Dr Nicholas Thompson (Theological and Religious Studies) responds to Michael Bird's opinion piece in which he argued that supporting LGBTI rights and opposing Islamophobia is a "social progressive paradox". ABC Religion and Ethics, Wednesday 15 June 2016.

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Hillary Clinton secures Democratic nomination

Dr Maria Armoudian (Politics and International Relations) discusses Hillary Clinton securing enough delegates to become the presumptive Democratic Presidential nominee. Paul Henry, Wednesday 8 June 2016.

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Māori once were tender fathers

Dame Anne Salmond (Māori Studies, Anthropology) utilises observations of Māori domestic life written by European men in the early eighteenth century to suggest that ethnicity and culture are not to blame for domestic abuse in New Zealand. NZ Herald, Thursday 26 May 2016.

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How reality TV creates a baying mob

Dr Ronald Kramer (Sociology) argues that there is a link between televised mean-spirited behaviour and the way ordinary people conduct themselves. NZ Herald, Saturday 5 March 2016.

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Super Tuesday

Associate Professor Steve Hoadley talks about the US primary presidential election event that culminates in Super Tuesday. Radio NZ, The Panel, Wednesday 2 March.

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Celebrity flag endorsements can backfire

Associate Professor Jennifer Lees-Marshment (Politics and International Relations) says high-profile endorsements for either flag can boost public engagement, but they can also backfire. Newstalk ZB, Friday 26 February 2016.

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Way to give speeding message

Associate Professor Tim Dare (Philosophy) argues that driving faster delivers almost no benefits. Hawke's Bay Today, Thursday 25 February 2016.

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Hitler, Trump and the rise of the demagogue

Ali and Willie talk with Associate Professor Maartje Abbenhuis (History) about the rise of Donald Trump and comparisons with Hitler's rise to power in the 1930s. RadioLive, Tuesday 23 February 2016.

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Key losing his charm - politics professor

Associate Professor Jennifer Lees-Marshment (Politics and International Relations) says it appears as though the Prime Minister is losing his ability to win over the New Zealand public with his charm. Paul Henry Show, Thursday 18 February 2016.

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Hirini Kaa: nationhood and history

Kim Hill takes Dr Hirini Kaa (History) to task over nationhood, history and Waitangi Day. Saturday Morning, Radio New Zealand, Saturday 6 February 2016.

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The History of Sexuality

Associate Professor Kim Phillips (History) and Professor John Spurlock (Seton Hill University) talk to Patrick J. Ryan about writing the history of youth and sexuality in significantly different periods of time. CHILDHOOD: History and Critique podcast, Society for the History of Children and Youth, Monday 1 February 2016.

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Govt 'doing deals' at expense of transparency

Associate Professor Tim Dare (Philosophy) argues that New Zealand's recent fall in the Corruption Perceptions Index is because the current government is much more inclined to 'do deals' as opposed to going through a normal open business process. Newstalk ZB, Thursday 28 January 2016.

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'Lolita' And Lollipops: What Nabokov Had To Say About Nosh

Nina Martyris explores Vladimir Nabokov's paradoxical relationship with food, which was made vividly apparent in the recently published Letters to Véra, co-edited by Distinguished Professor Brian Boyd (English, Drama and Writing Studies). The Salt, NPR, Tuesday 26 January 2016.

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Dear Mike Hosking – I saw your Waitangi rant, and I can help

Dr Hirini Kaa (History) responds to Mike Hosking's comments about Waitangi Day. The Spinoff, Friday 22 January 2016.

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What does Netflix's Making a Murderer mean for the New Zealand justice system?

In the United States, 1728 wrongly-convicted people have been exonerated since 1989 - but a Dr Ronald Kramer (Sociology) argues that there is no reason to believe New Zealand's justice system is getting it wrong any less often.

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Dress-up academic surprises himself

Six months ago, Dr Colin Cremin startled his sociology students by walking into the lecture theatre wearing full makeup, an above-the-knee black skirt, pantyhose and court shoes. New Zealand Herald, Saturday 2 January 2016.

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The Pope's New Zealand connection

Dr Robert Myles (Theological and Religious Studies) comments on the reception of Pope Francis as more progressive than his predecessors on a number of issues. The Press, Friday 1 January 2016.

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South Korea doubles down on Green Growth

Dr Sung-Young Kim (Politics and International Relations) discusses how South Korea is quickly rising as a world leader in the creation, development and export of renewable energy technologies — widely viewed by analysts as strategic growth industries of the future. East Asia Forum, Friday 25 December 2015.

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Let's show goodwill towards Islam at Christmas

Dr Zain Ali (Islamic Studies Research Unit) responds to John Roughan's recent comment that "It's hard to think of Islam with any goodwill, even at Christmas." New Zealand Herald, Wednesday 9 December 2015.

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Armenia Marks Centenary Of Genocide

Dr Maria Armoudian (Politics and International Relations) appears alongside Serj Tankian to discuss the Armenian genocide. Newsworthy, Monday 7 December 2015.

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Robert Sanders: What is Chinese?

Dr Robert Sanders (Asian Studies) responds to an article in the New Zealand Herald pondering the question of how many people in New Zealand speak Chinese. New Zealand Herald, Friday 4 December 2015.

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Russian pilot says he was never warned about flying in Turkish airspace

Associate Professor Steve Hoadley (Politics and International Relations) talks with Paul Henry about the simmering tensions between Russia and Turkey. RadioLIVE, Thursday 26 November 2015.

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New Zealand Debates Replacing Union Jack Flag, but With What?

Dr Barry Milne (COMPASS) discusses polls that consistently show that 60 to 70 percent of New Zealanders are content with the flag they have. New York Times, Saturday 28 October 2015.

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Survey says 325,000 more Kiwi kids will be obese by 2025

Dr Nichola Shackleton (COMPASS) talks with Paul Henry about obesity and the socio-economic cost of Kiwi kids becoming obese. Paul Henry Show, Tuesday 13 October.

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Kardashians' waist trainer a blast from the past

Dr Kirby-Jane Hallum argues that the new waist trainer, a type of modern-day corset touted by the Kardashian family as a way to shrink your waist, takes women back more than 100 years. Stuff, Thursday 9 October.

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Is the Media Dinosaur-Crazy at the Expense of Other Sciences?

David Farrier confronts PhD candidate in Media, Film and Television Ian Randall about his claim that the media are dinosaur obsessed, printing and televising dinosaur news willy-nilly at the expense of other important science news. Newsworthy, Wednesday 9 October.

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What does it mean to be a Kiwi?

Associate Professor Caroline Daley (History) discusses national identity. Radio Live, Sunday 4 October.

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Slavery and Māori

Honorary Academic Dr Hazel Petrie (Māori Studies) talks to Kim Hill about her latest book, Outcasts of the Gods? The Struggle over Slavery in Maori New Zealand. Radio NZ, Saturday 19 September 2015.

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Flag vote 'a waste of time' - historian

Associate Professor Caroline Daley (History) discusses the proposed change of the New Zealand flag. Paul Henry Show, Tuesday 2 September 2015.

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Anne Tolley's 'lab rats' call inflammatory political rhetoric

Associate Professor Tim Dare (Philosophy) on Social Development Minister Anne Tolley’s canning of a proposal to test a computer model designed to identify children at risk of maltreatment. Dominion Post, Monday 3 August 2015.

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Global war, global catastrophe: historians discuss the First World War

Associate Professor Maartje Abbenhuis (History) discusses the history and legacies of the First World War with Esther MacIntyre in the lead up to this year's Winter Lectures. Ready Steady Learn, 95bFM, Wednesday 22 July 2015.

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The Pacific Implications of China’s Proposed NGO Law

Dr Stephen Noakes (Politics and International Relations) and Victoria Brownlee argue that China's new draft law for foreign NGOs could undermine engagement in the South Pacific. The Diplomat, Friday 10 July 2015.

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Honouring the memory of the Rainbow Warrior

Dr Ryan Tucker Jones (History) and Sue Taei (Greenpeace) reflect on the 30th anniversary of the bombing of the Rainbow Warrior. Dominion Post, Friday 10 July 2015.

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Magna Carta 800

Associate Professor Jennifer Lees-Marshment and Dr Stephen Winter (Politics and International Relations) discuss the Magna Carta 800 lecture series being held at the University from 6-10 July 2015. Radio NZ, Saturday Morning with Noelle McCarthy, Saturday 4 July 2015.

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Addicted to sex? It’s unlikely, say academics

Professor Barry Reay, Dr Nina Attwood and Dr Claire Goode (History) have written a book called Sex Addiction: A Critical History that dispels the idea that sex addiction even exists. Times Higher Education, Thursday 7 July.

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US election: Bush vs Clinton again?

Dr Maria Armoudian (Politics and International Relations) discusses Jeb Bush's plans to formally announce that he is running for President of the United States in 2016. He is likely to face of against Democratic frontrunner Hillary Clinton. Paul Henry Show, TV3, Tuesday 16 June 2015.

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800-year-old Great Charter still has value today

Dr Stephen Winter (Politics and International Relations) on the value of the Magna Carta in New Zealand today. NZ Herald, Friday 12 June 2015.

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Shakespeare-era London

Professor Tom Bishop (English, Drama and Writing Studies) discusses his work alongside a group of postgraduate English students researching a sixteenth-century building believed to be the first custom-built theatre since the Romans as part of the Map of Early Modern London project. Radio New Zealand, Standing Room Only, Sunday 7 June.

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Gavin Ellis on Nine to Noon

Dr Gavin Ellis (Media, Film and Television) talks to Kathryn Ryan about the Fairfax restructuring, and a dignified exit from John Campbell. Radio New Zealand, Nine to Noon, Tuesday 2 June 2015.

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Joan Kirner obituary: the woman premier who represented many firsts

Associate Professor Jennifer Curtin (Politics and International Relations) pens an obituary for Joan Kirner, Victoria's first and still only woman premiere. Sydney Morning Herald, Tuesday 2 June 2015.

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Paula Morris on coming home

Dr Paula Morris (English, Drama and Writing Studies) discusses her new book On Coming Home  that deals with what it is like returning to New Zealand after decades living abroad. Radio New Zealand, Monday 1 June 2015.

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Avoiding armageddon

Lyndon Burford (doctoral candidate in Politics and International Relations), discusses the geopolitical difficulties in advancing nuclear disarmament. New Zealand Herald, Friday 29 May 2015.

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Damon Salesa on The Nation

Associate Professor Damon Salesa (Pacific Studies) joins Tracy Watkins and Fran O'Sullivan to wrap up a big week of poitics. TV3, The Nation, Saturday 23 May 2015.

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Jennifer Curtin on Three60

Associate Professor Jennifer Curtin (Politics and International Relations) provides ongoing comment on the UK General Election. Three60, TV3, Sunday 10 May and Sunday 17  May.

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Gavin Ellis and Stephen Winter on Media Take

Senior Lecturer Dr Gavin Ellis (Media, Film and Television) on gossip becoming part of the news in the context of ponytail-gate, and Dr Stephen Winter (Politics and Internaitonal Relations) on the price of democracy and the United States elections. Media Take, Māori Television, Tuesday 28 April 2015.

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Maria Armoudian speaks with Kim Hill about the Armenian Genocide

Dr Maria Armoudian (Politics and International Relations) on the genocide of an estimated 1.5 million Christian Armenians in 1915. Saturday Morning with Kim Hill, Radio New Zealand, Saturday 25 April 2015.

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Human rights in Saudi Arabia - Should questions be asked before trade talks commence?

Associate Professor Steve Hoadley (Politics and International Relations) discusses Saudia Arabias’ human rights record. Radio Live, Tuesday 28 April 2015.

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Rare golden 'Koran' on show in NZ

Head of Islamic studies Dr Zain Ali discusses the 200-year-old "golden Koran", which contains pages layered in gold, that will be displayed at Auckland's central library next month. 

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Ponytail fallout: Global media reaction

Dr Ronald Kramer (Sociology) on how the Prime Minister’s pulling of a waitress’s ponytail puts her in a powerless position where she was unable to "fight back". NZ Herald, Thursday 23 April 2015.

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Fiji questions Pacific Forum

Associate Professor Damon Salesa (Pacific Studies) on how Fiji is asking the big questions about regionalism in the Pacific and raising concerns about the dominance of Australia and New Zealand in the Pacific Forum. Radio NZ (Dateline Pacific). Monday 20 April 2015.

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Honour all victims of Turkish brutality

Dr Maria Armoudian (Politics and International Relations) discusses the importance of commemorating all who perished at the hands of the Young Turk government. The New Zealand Herald, Thursday 23 April 2015.

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Why more New Zealand women - particularly Maori - are being jailed

Associate Professor Tracey McIntosh (Sociology) discusses how greater investment in the social needs of young New Zealanders needs to be a priority in order to help to reduce our prison populations. Radio NZ, Nine to Noon, Thursday 23 April 2015.

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Gloriavale: 'Intense' focus on Hopeful Christian

Lecturer Dr Nick Thompson (Theology) on how the Gloriavale Christian Community's beliefs were similar to evangelical Christian groups, but the community’s isolation makes it different. NZ Herald. Tuesday 21 April 2015.

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Bougainville police disarmed in pursuit across Solomon Islands border

Associate Professor Steve Hoadley (Politics and International Relations) on how laws governing the hot pursuit of fugitives from one country to another across a sea border are not well defined. ABC Radio Australia, Monday 20 April 2015.

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Hillary Clinton aims to raise $2B for presidential bid

Dr Maria Armoudian (Politics and International Relations) discusses Hillary Clinton’s announcement that she will run for the Democratic nomination for next year's US presidential elections. The Paul Henry Show, Monday 13 April 2015.

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The flow on effect of diverse schools

Associate Professor Damon Salesa talks with Duncan Garner about educational segregation, Auckland housing and inequality in Auckland on Radio Live, Wednesday 8 April 2015.

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Chris Wilson on the Bali Nine and why New Zealanders should care about two Australians getting the death penalty

Dr Chris Wilson (Politics and International Relations) discusses the  rejection of the Bali Nine pair's appeal for clemency by an Indonesian court. The Paul Henry Show, Tuesday 7 April 2015.

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ANZAC Day covers up genocide

Dr Maria Armoudian (Politics and International Relations) argues that Turkey's hosting of the ANZAC celebrations in Gallipoli are another way of covering up the Armenian genocide. Newstalk ZB, Monday 6 April 2015.

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Changing attitudes towards graffiti

Dr Ronald Kramer (Sociology) talks to George Freeman about attitudes towards graffiti, particularly in light of Keep New Zealand Beautiful’s ‘Graffiti Free Week’. 95bFM, Friday 27 March 2015.

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Panel: Patrick Gower, Damon Salesa & Ben Thomas

Associate Professor Damon Salesa (Pacific Studies) discusses the Northland by-election. The Nation, TV3, Sunday 22 March 2015.

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Stephen Winter: TV3's X-Factor bullying apology insincere

Dr Stephen Winter (Politics & International Relations) writes an opinion piece on how the sacking of Natalia Kills and Willy Moon as judges on X Factor brings a sharp ending to a series of scandals for which TV3 has been attempting to apologise. NZ Herald, Tuesday 17 March 2015.

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Censorship through the ages

Dr Geoff Kemp (Politics and International Relations) has recently edited Censorship Moments: Reading Texts in the History of Censorship and Freedom of Expression (Bloomsbury). He looks back at censorship through the ages, and how these days it's mainly regarded as the enemy of free speech. Radio New Zealand, Standing Room Only, Sunday 22 February 2015.

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Dr Kirsten Zemke discusses Eminem taking the National party to court on Breakfast

Dr Kirsten Zemke of Anthropology talks to TVNZ about why music's 'beat and feel' are difficult to copyright, Friday 13 February 2015.

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Twelve Questions: Paula Morris

Dr Paula Morris answers Sarah Stuart's 'Twelve Questions' in the New Zealand Herald, Tuesday 10 February 2015.

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Associate Professor Jennifer Curtin discusses Tony Abbott's leadership ballot

Associate Professor Jennifer Curtin discusses Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott’s move to bring his  leadership ballot forward by a day in order to bypass a question time with the opposition, 3 News, Monday 9 February 2015.

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Dr Misha Kavka on One News

Dr Misha Kavka discusses the rise of digital and on-demand television on One News, Tuesday 3 February 2015.

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Dr Shuchi Kothari on Bollywood movies and stalking

Associate Professor Shuchi Kothari discusses claims that Bollywood movies cause stalking. Radio New Zealand, The Panel, 30/01/2015.

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Dr Misha Kavka in the Herald on Sunday

Dr Misha Kavka discusses the future of TV and the rise of digital and on-demand services as competition for viewers increases. Herald on Sunday, 01/02/2015.

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Stephen Noakes speaks on Three60

Dr Stephen Noakes (Politics and International Relations) discusses the visit of Chinese president Xi Jinping to New Zealand and the open letter he wrote to New Zealanders prior to his visit.

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Gavin Ellis discusses how the media report news

Honorary Academic Gavin Ellis (Media, Film & Television) discusses reading newspapers vs. online coverage and the media's handling of the revelations that Raurimu killer Stephen Anderson is teaching at a Wellington art school.

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Iran nuclear talks in final 36 hours

Associate Professor Stephen Hoadley (Politics and International Relations) discusses on Firstline the last-ditch diplomatic efforts to reach a deal with Iran over the future size of their nuclear programme.

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Totalled: Salvaging the future from the wreckage of capitalism

Dr Colin Cremin (Sociology) talks to Gary Farrow on 95bFM on Tuesday 27 January 2015 about his new book, Totalled: Salvaging the future from the wreckage of capitalism.

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Brian Boyd on Vladimir Nabokov's letters

Professor Brian Boyd is the author of a new collection of previously unseen letters from Russian-American novelist Vladimir Nabokov to his beloved wife, Vera. Professor Boyd has written and edited 19 books and over 250 articles and an extensive website on Nabokov and his work has been translated into fifteen languages and received many awards. Radio New Zealand, Nine to Noon, 27/01/2015.

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New Findings on the fate of Easter Island's indigenous population

Professor Thegn Ladefoged (Anthropology) speaks to Gary Farrow on 95bFM on Tuesday 20 January 2015 about the study that he co-authored that challenges traditional interpretations of the demise of the Rapa Nui people.

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Temporary release important for reintegration

Dr Tracey McIntosh spoke on Firstline about letting prisoners out on a temporary basis to help prepare for reintegration into society, and whether a mistake was made with Phillip John Smith.

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Chinese president Xi Jinping visits NZ

Research Fellow Dr Xin Chen (NZ Asia Institute) speaks on Radio New Zealand Morning Report about the visit of Chinese President Xi Jinping.

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The secret is out

Otago Daily Times reports that Dunedin musician and BA graduate Dudley Benson has received a $25,000 New Generation Award at the 2014 Westpac New Zealand Arts Awards.

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Death threats and video games

Professional Teaching Fellow Dr Suzanne Woodward, (Media, Film and Television) on the role of women within video games, noting that they feature rarely and usually fulfil a 'decorative' role when they do.

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Hone Sadler releases book on Ngāpuhi history and origins

Senior Lecturer Hone Sadler (Māori Studies) discusses his book Ko Tautoro Te Pito o Toku Ao on Ta Karere, which draws from his 40 years' experience in Māori education.

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Curator inspired by 'breathtaking' collection

Greg Anderson, a graduate in History and Arts History from the University of Auckland discusses his role as senior curator at the Sarjeant Gallery with the Wanganui Chronicle.

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Poems present world through Māori eyes

Former University of Auckland literature lecturer Reina Whaitiri (English) is featured on Waatea News after having edited the book Puna Wai Korero: An Anthology of Māori Poetry in English alongside editor Robert Sullivan (doctoral candidate, English).

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Associate Professor Gregory Booth dicusses Diwali

Associate Professor Gregory Booth (Anthropology) discusses the history of the Diwali Festival on 95bFM.

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Hong Kong protestors issue ultimatum

Professor Manying Ip (Asian Studies) discusses the protest action in Hong Kong on the Mike Hosking Breakfast Show.

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Professor Raymond Miller on Q+A

Associate Professor Raymond Miller (Politics & International Relations) talks on TV One's Q+A about Labour's policies and John Key's responce to surveillance claims.

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Hong Kong protestors issue ultimatum

Professor Manying Ip (Asian Studies) discusses the protest action in Hong Kong on the Mike Hosking Breakfast Show.

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Associate Professor Gregory Booth dicusses Diwali

Associate Professor Gregory Booth (Anthropology) discusses the history of the Diwali Festival on 95bFM.

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Ancient Waka

Dilys Johns, Senior Research Fellow (Anthropology) talks to National Radio about a 600 year old waka that she has been studying.

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Ready Steady Learn

Dr Misha Kavka, Associate Dean (Academic) of Media, Film and Television, speaks to bFM about the recently released QS World University Rankings.

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How marketing is affecting this election

Associate Professor Jennifer Lees-Marshment (Politics & International Relations) writes an opinion piece in the NZ Herald on how marketing is affecting this election.

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Fiji's first election in eight years: Why so many coups in paradise?

Senior Lecturer Dr Steven Ratuva (Pacific Studies) writes on CNN on Fiji’s first democratic elections in eight years.

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Hong Kong's electoral system under threat

Dr Steven Noakes discusses the Hong Kong Pro-democracy protests.

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Nominated PM in Iraq not likely to stay

Doctoral candidate Hossein Aghapouri (Politics & International Relations) speaks on RadioNZ on the continuing conflict in Iraq and the proposed air strikes by the United States.

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NZ can be a leader in forging brave blue world

Distinguished Professor Dame Anne Salmond’s (Māori Studies) opinion piece on how NZ can be a leader in forging a future where businesses, communities and ecosystems flourish together.

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Nominated PM in Iraq not likely to stay

Doctoral candidate Hossein Aghapouri (Politics & International Relations) speaks on RadioNZ on the continuing conflict in Iraq and the proposed air strikes by the United States.

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NZ can be a leader in forging brave blue world

Distinguished Professor Dame Anne Salmond’s (Māori Studies) opinion piece on how NZ can be a leader in forging a future where businesses, communities and ecosystems flourish together.

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Let's talk about gossip

Associate Professor Jennifer Frost discusses her latest book “When Private Talk Goes Public: Gossip in American History” on Radio New Zealand’s Sunday Morning with Wallace Chapman. She also discussed the book on TV3’s Firstline.

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Harvard Professor interviewed on plight of history

Professor David Armitage of Harvard University delivered the 2014 Keith Sinclair Lecture on “Horizons of History: Space, Time and the Future of the Past” at the University on Monday 21 July. While in New Zealand he was interviewed by Wallace Chapman of Radio New Zealand.

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War crimes in Gaza

Professor Scott Poynting (Sociology) writes a letter to the editor in the Weekend Herald on how Israel has committed war crimes in its attacks on Gaza.

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Portrayals of dragons and medieval life influenced by Tolkien

Senior Lecturer Dr Lindsay Diggelman (History) speaks on The Panel about how portrayals of dragons and medieval culture have changed through time.

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Russia has lost some control of rebels - Smith

PhD Candidate Nicholas Ross Smith (Politics & International Relations) on how the shooting down of MH17 by pro-Russian separatists could prompt a new Cold War.

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Professor shortlisted for prestigious award

Professor of English Michele Leggott’s book Heartland (published by Auckland University Press) has been shortlisted for the 2014 New Zealand Post Book Awards

Learning Māori a 'political statement' for some

Senior Research Fellow Joseph Te Rito (Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga) talks on RadioNZ about how learning Te Reo is a political statement for some Māori and a way of showing they still exist.

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Japanese culture becoming globally appropriated

Senior Lecturer Dr Rumi Sakamoto (Asian Studies) comments on how Christchurch rock duo Doprah is inspired by Japanese pop music, known as ‘‘J-Pop’’, and ‘‘kawaii’’ (cute) culture.

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More prisons not the answer

Senior Lecturer Dr Alice Mills (Sociology) comments in the Bay of Plenty Times on the lack of rehabilitation programmes for women in prison and how the closing of some smaller prisons makes it difficult for families to visit inmates.

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France and the two World Wars

Associate Professor Simon Kitson (French) speaks on ABC Radio about French history and culture.

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Children with same-sex parents do better- study

Paul Kramer (Politics and International Relations) analyses on TV One the results of an Australian study that shows children of same sex marriages scored better on a number of key measures of physical health and social well-being than kids from the general population.

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Nations' days of celebration and protest

Associate Professor Jennifer Frost (History) writes in the NZ Herald on the significance of the 4th of July.

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First Japanese PM visit in twelve years

PhD candidate and Japan expert Corey Wallace (Politics and International Relations) talks on TV One about Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's visit to New Zealand, the first visit by a Japanese Prime Minister in 12 years.

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Fences go up - friendliness comes down

Inequality is eating away at the trust in our neighbourhoods, replacing it with suspicion, writes Emeritis Professor Michael Neill (English) in the NZ Herald.

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Dr Kristen Zemke on 'dark and ambient' music

Senior Lecturer Dr Kirsten Zemke (Anthropology) features on 95bFM to talk about dark and ambient music.

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Working abroad: is the grass greener?

Dr Caroline Blyth (Theology) has written an article for The Times on the experience of living and working in New Zealand compared to her experiences in the United Kingdom. 

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Making History

Associate Professor Simon Kitson (School of European Languages and Literatures) has been interviewed on BBC Radio for the 70th Anniversary of D-Day this week. He travelled to the UK to discuss his paper ‘Criminals or Liberators? Public Opinion and the Allied bombing of France’ as a studio guest of the programme Making History.

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Robert Greenberg: BA just the job - you can Be Anything

Dean of Arts Professor Robert Greenberg writes in the New Zealand Herald on the value of a Bachelor of Arts .

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Post-crime, fear reigns where kids once played

Dr Ronald Kramer (Sociology) features in the New Zealand Herald and discusses the impact of Blesilda "Blessie" Gotingco’s murder on the Birkdale community.

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For the Love of Books: Poet Michele Leggott

Professor Michelle Leggott (English) talks to Viva about her love of books and poetry.

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Associate Professor Jennifer Curtin discusses the electoral power of women

Associate Professor Jennifer Curtin (Politics and International Relations) discusses how women can use our electoral power to achieve change; what strategies have been used in other countries.

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Dr Selina Marsh discusses Pasifika female voices

Dr Selina Tusitala Marsh (English) discusses Pasifika female voices in poetry; exclusion of Pasifika women from debate; poetry as subversive.

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MH370: The white hot rage driving Chinese families

Lecturer in Politics and International Relations Dr Stephen Noakes and Professor of Asian Studies Paul Clark join Paul Henry to discuss the reaction from Chinese families regarding the Malaysian goverment's stance on the missing flight.

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New book from Professor Linda Bryder

Professor Linda Bryder talks to Andrew Dickens about her book, 'The Rise and Fall of National Women's Hospital'.

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Professor Linda Bryder talks about her book, 'The Rise and Fall of National Women's Hospital' on Radio New Zealand’s Wallace Chapman.

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Everyman v oligarchs for president

Dr Chris Wilson writes about the upcoming Indonesian elections.

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Blackouts to become more frequent - study

Associate Professor Steve Matthewman speaks on OneNews about why power blackouts may become more common in the coming years.

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Weather forecasting - a brief history

Senior Lecturer Geoff Kemp (Politics and International Relations) takes a look at the last 160 years of news reporting and the relative weight given to political news and the coverage of the weather.

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Race Relations Day in NZ

Senior Lecturer Avril Bell (Sociology) writes about New Zealand's immigration and refugee policies.

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Robert Greenberg: Ukraine

RadioLive speaks with Dean of Arts, Professor Robert Greenberg on the developments, politics and political history in the Ukraine.

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Geoff Kemp: When well-meaning ideals collide

Politics and International Relations Senior Lecturer Geoff Kemp discusses whether journalists can make the world a better place in the New Zealand Herald.

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New research predicts more power black-outs across the world

Sociology Associate Professor Steve Matthewman speaks to Radio New Zealand about his new paper ‘Blackouts: A Sociology of Electrical Power Failure’.

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American security expert

Elaine Tyler May, Regents Professor of American Studies and History at the University of Minnesota, speaks to Radio NZ about whether America's obsession with national security over the past half century made the world any safer. Professor Tyler May is a University of Auckland Distinguished Visitor 2014.

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US' obsession with guns

University of Minnesota's Elaine Tyler May talks to Mike Hosking at NewstalkZB about the US' obsession with security and guns.  Professor Tyler May is a University of Auckland Distinguished Visitor 2014.

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Russia military intervention in Ukraine

Dean of Arts, Professor Robert Greenberg, speaks to RadioNZ about the continuing conflict between Russian and the Ukraine.

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