2008 NZCLAS events


Revolutionary Effervescence: Frida Kahlo and Manuel Alvarez Bravo

24 April 2008
Hood Fellows: Professor John Mraz and Professor Eli Bartra

The Mexican Revolution of 1910-1917 resulted in an artistic flowering that focused around the re-definition of national identity. Frida Kahlo’s shocking self-portraits stood in stunning juxtaposition to the work of the famous muralists, among them her husband, Diego Rivera. One of the greatest Latin American photographers, Manuel Alvarez Bravo explored Mexicanness in understated but powerful aesthetics.

John Mraz is a Research Professor at the Instituto de Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades, Universidad Autónoma de Puebla (Mexico). He has published widely on the uses of photography, cinema, and video in recounting the histories of Mexico and Cuba, directed award-winning documentary videotapes, and curated international exhibits of photography.

Eli Bartra is a Professor in the Department of Politics and Culture of the Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Xochimilco in Mexico City. Co-founder and Director of the Graduate Program on Women’s Studies, she has published extensively on feminist studies, and women’s art.

View an article on John Mraz and Eli Barta from the 25 April 2008 issue of the University of Auckland News

Brazil in Aotearoa New Zealand: Researching the Cultural Dynamics of a Unique and Diverse Nation

4 April 2008
NZCLAS 2008 Symposium on Brazil

Symposium on Latin American and Indigenous Documentary Film

28-29 March 2009

9.30-12.30pm: Indigenous Film and Photography in Aotearoa and Latin America
1.30-4.30pm: Documentary and New Social Movements in Latin America

Keynote Presenters:
Professor John Mraz, Hood Fellow, Univ. Autónoma de Puebla, Mexico. Alexandra Alkin, Chiapas Media Project, Mexico.
Professor Eli Bartra, Hood Fellow, Univ. Autónoma Metropolitana-Xochimilco, Mexico.

Photography, Visual History and Photojournalism

19 March 2008
Hood Fellow Professor John Mraz

John Mraz is Research Professor at the Instituto de Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades, Universidad Autónoma de Puebla (Mexico). He has published widely on the uses of photography, cinema, and video in recounting the histories of Mexico and Cuba, directed award-winning documentary videotapes, and curated international exhibits of photography. Among his recent works are the book, Nacho López: Mexican Photographer (University of Minnesota Press, 2003); the documentary production, En torno al caso de Rosalie Evans (2004); and the photo exhibit “Ojos ajenos. Fotografías de extranjeros en México” for the Huesca (Spain) Festival.